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for us. but it all started about two days before election day. i had this realization that this was a possibility. this could actually happen. i went to the door of rabin's office and said, what if all of these major offices were held by women? this would be historic. we should do any event if it happens. so, as my friends now, my family, i am a self-proclaimed news and political junkie. on election night and had the tv, my laptop, and my i found, i was watching as the results came in. and it was happening. it happened. so yes, there were phone calls, there were e-mails, logistics', food selection, printing, tables, chairs, all the logistics. how this event king together is a question -- what if? what if we could get them. and i am so happy that we have. i am sure all of them will agree that type of vision is what put all of these five women where they are today. that question -- what if? today's event is bigger. it is bigger than political parties, bigger than politics. bigger than the chamber of commerce. today it is history in the making. it is not just a raised gla
law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before t
delayed provincial and local elections, and strengthening state institutions to provide much needed public services. we believe the time has come for the drc and the international community to permanently break the cycle of violence and impunity that exists in the region. today's crisis is a deep tragedy. but it also offers an opportunity to help the drc and the regent -- the region to set itself on its path toward peace and prosperity. we encouraged them to achieve the goals that we all seek. thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you very much. secretary, please describe the strategic defense priorities within africa and how does the situation in the drc situation with these priorities? >> thanks for the question. a person and foremost, the prairie recently has been on counterterrorism issues. -- first and foremost, the priority recently has been on counter-terrorism issues. can you hear me now? the top priority has always been the defense of the people. we have been acutely focused on defense issues. most importantly in north africa where they have gotten the most attention. we are also keen
that people are granted 2010 it got elected or the people ran before and it now ascended to positions of leadership believes that go with a solution or they were like that to not do things i supposed to do things? >> well, again, from a class of 2010 and our effort to the the 87 freshman, the so-called tea party class of the 112 congress, their belief is they are doing precisely what the people who elected them did, which is rolled back obama initiatives, cut spending. a lot that the debt ceiling should not be increased under a circumstances where they feel like i was a failure. but they basically believe their job is first to obstruct barack obama and once there is a republican president in place to pass this initiatives that create better business climate. more and more deregulation committee funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. i think they do believe -- of course to fast-forward a bit about the debt ceiling fiasco of 2011, but after the summer we were taken to the brink of a fiscal cliff, one we are about to see it it can come in to thinking part o
. 18 years later i got elected to congress and i called reagan's secretary and let me see if i can arrange this. they arranged it and mom and kenny came. we parked behind the white house. we went into the oval office and president reagan came over and said, i want to tell you your son is one of the brightest young congressman we have and he is going to do great things. i know you have to wait on tables for 18 years and it worked in a foundry. and danny had to shine shoes. i know it was tough. we had those problems in my family. isn't it great we live in a country where you can achieve anything? all i could think was, how did he know this stuff? he had had his secretary call to find out about me and my family. when i walked out of that office, i would have done anything for that man. he made my mother feel so happy. she was so happy and she carried the picture until she died. her favorite actor was ronald reagan. >> a lesson for that about relationships for president is the personal touch? >> it is a big part of it but it was not just a personal touch. he had goals like the strategi
. this is the first time they have met since the election. guest: november 16 was the only time they met. it is good news they are talking. are they going to keep talking? will they say, "we will see everybody tomorrow." they would keep talking. what is going to happen on the floors of the house and senate. the senate needs to extend the tax rates a year and amended and that can be done in a matter of hours. when they agree to that -- would they agree to that? we also have to watch the tone. i go back to last friday. there was a press conference and 95% was angry and criticizing democrats but at the end, john boehner said he was still optimistic. host: maybe we should send your dog in. if there is no agreement, mobil the new congress face -- what will the new congress face? guest: it depends what the markets do. doesn't take a lot to get legislation on the floor. if we have gone over the cliff, what motivates congress is the markets. if the dow is down hundreds of points, they will act fast. if the markets are giving a tentative signal, i do not think the urgency will be fthere. host: the relationsh
elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues got resolved on civil rights. legislatively. things moved on. senator byrd gets on the leadership ladder and he rises. he becomes the whip in a stealth campaign. the idea of robert byrd as leader goes from being inconceivable to virtually inevitable. he has earned his way up to be leader. at the beginning of my book, he becomes leader and replaces mike mansfield, who is sort of an icon. no one thinks byrd can replace mike mansfield. but the truth is, no one thought that mike mansfield could
quickly rose to be the voice of democracy in burma, creating the national league for democracy. elections followed in 1990, where her party won 80% of the seats. that joy quickly turned to tragedy. the military junta nullified the election and arrested aung san suu kyi. she would spend the better part of two decades under house arrest, unable even to visit her dying husband. in 1996, i recall being approached to sponsor a burma sanctions bill. sanctions were put in place in 1997 andsanctions were only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell later became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates in the senate and we continued to work on behalf of the people in burma. in 2003, following an assassination attempt, senator mcconnell and i worked to pass an important and that remains in -- that remainsban in place today, an effort to bring about further reform. and i must say, burma is extremely lucky to have a champion mike aung san suu kyi. -- like on songs hoochy like aung san suu kyi -- like aung san suu kyi. in the face of violence, harassment, intimidation, she has never wavered
of 8 months to the next federal election in germany, for instance. greece therefore is the sick person europe. of the world. meanwhile, the united states of america is ungovernable. you have a system in this country that was created to create this country as an ungovernable state. you have congress, the president canceling each other out. how the president -- whoever the president might be -- do anything? you have china -- finding it impossible to provide a replacement for the demand that the west has done away with. so, i do not have an answer for your question. bewilderment. >> my question is about consumer demand and the extent to which the old system depended on it. if we do not have it to the same degree, could there possibly be a new economy? i cannot know how to say all of these in the right economic terms. i will say what i am thinking and see what you make out of it. its teams like all the economy's got to a point where it had to be based on growth. it could not just be sustainable. it had to grow. and that meant more consumers. so, then, that led to a lot of things ecological
panel. i will start here with jaime herrera beutler, elected to congress in 2010 representing southwest washington state's third district. she just turned 34 and she is the youngest woman currently serving in congress. welcome, jaime. [applause] next to her, the former chief of staff at the white house national economic council, the former chief of staff for larry summers at harvard university and currently the vice-president of global public policy for this company may have heard of -- facebook. next to me is michelle kwan, the most decorated figure skater in u.s. history. we all remember watching you at the olympics. i can still remember some of the routine. she also has another cool job now appear in you -- job now. she works in the u.s. department of state. i guess i just want to start out and talk about how you rise to the top. what are the hard parts? >> i would not say i'm at the top just yet. we are waiting for bacthat. maybe someone in the back or watching this will go all the way. >> when do you think we're going to have a woman president? >> ee in our lifetime. out be very su
democracy work." i said, by the way, will it be translated into chinese? the elections in this book are important for the chinese and i believe the chinese leadership would read this book. he said that they are in the middle of trying to do that right now. and sure enough, the book sold very well in china. and justice breyer went to china in june. he was very well received, talking about his book, including what i thought was a wonderful moment of poetic justice. on the cover here -- as you all know, here he is as the cover story. and that is interesting. what i find even more interesting is the date of this magazine is june 4. so, i thought to myself -- that might have been lost on the editor. so, it has thrilled me know wind that someone as imminent as justice breyer has become increasingly engaged on this topic. when we were talking earlier, he talked about during the conversation. and i said, "trust me, i am going to drag you into this thing every step of the way." if you ever lose your day job, you could be a permanent diplomat. we are very pleased to have him here today. where
is to elect more centrists. second, if the two parties met together in caucuses periodically. right now both sides caucus every week. most of that is focused on partisan advantage. i think it would be enormously useful if there were caucuses focused on the senate because of size where all senators met periodically in a caucus setting without the benefit of the media. i'm sorry. i think as we caucus now behind closed doors, i think a meeting of senators -- republicans and democrats on a periodic basis that was focused on problem solving would be enormously beneficial. >> thank you. anything else you want to say? >> i have enjoyed this opportunity. it has been an honor to serve in that united states senate. i leave with enormous respect for the men and women who serve. i leave with enormous respect for the institution. i know better days are ahead. it has been an absolute privilege to represent the people of north dakota in the united states senate. the vast majority of my colleagues are well intended to do what is best for the country. -- are well-intentioned and best for do what is the count
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)